Financial incentives, elimination of regulatory barriers may help expand availability of small-house nursing homes: report

The authors also encouraged state policymakers to consider updating their CON laws and construction moratoria for nursing homes to allow for greater innovation in the marketplace. They also stressed the need to expedite adoption of key model features associated with quality improvement. For example, the authors noted, policymakers should promote more research and demonstration of how key features of the Green House model, including the “universal worker” staffing model and the use of private rooms, could be adopted by larger facilities.

Read More

More News

  • “There is always going to be a portion of people who require maybe a more intensive level of care and also always a proportion of people who would prefer to receive care in a communal setting. How are you setting yourself up to be that provider of choice in a market where maybe there’s less global demand for nursing home beds, but people want privacy, people want to really know their caregivers?”

  • “The evidence so far is that the staff is significantly more engaged with residents, avoidable hospitalizations and readmission rates are lower, and family satisfaction is higher. Perhaps most surprising to those who focus on costs, both interventions saw operating margins and market position tick up.”

  • “Most people with ALS want to stay home rather than suffer the indignity of moving to a traditional nursing home. I hope for a world in which the Leonard Florence Center for Living is the standard of care in America.”

  • “We have seen significant positive outcomes with this model of care, and I really think it is the empowered staff and the meaningful life focus that we have at the Green House home that contributes to keeping our staff, having our staff engaged, and really having them feel like they are the key in that relationship.”